Written by Denise Deby.

Human Rights Monument by Ross Dunn on Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic https://www.flickr.com/photos/rdb466/17860996059

Human Rights Monument by Ross Dunn on Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic https://www.flickr.com/photos/rdb466/17860996059

Municipal governments have a lot of influence on the environment. Their decisions affect how we manage waste, use energy, take transportation and nurture green space. Through their actions, or inaction, cities influence air, land and water health, climate change, and the distribution of resources and benefits among citizens.

Urban governments can also be at the forefront of spurring positive environmental change, sometimes even when other levels of government fall short.

Vancouver is one city that has committed to being “the greenest city in the world,” with 2020 as the target date. Vancouver’s plan includes developing renewable energy systems, enhancing sustainable transportation, creating zero waste, strengthening the local food system and taking action in several other areas.

Can its commitment inspire Ottawa? On Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015, Vancouver city councillor and deputy mayor Andrea Reimer will be here to talk about her city’s plan. Joining her are Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Jody Williams, who is active locally, nationally and internationally in prompting decision-makers to address environmental and social justice, and Ottawa city councillor and chair of the city’s Environment Committee David Chernushenko.

The event, from 6-9 p.m. at City Hall, is organized by Ecology Ottawa, which in addition to its regular campaigns, promotes environmental leadership and stewardship at all levels of government, including federal.

 

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