Run for Good: Ottawa Race Weekend

Written by Denise Deby.

Photo by David Carroll on Flickr Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic https://www.flickr.com/photos/david_carroll/2521808913/in/photostream/
Photo by David Carroll on Flickr Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic https://www.flickr.com/photos/david_carroll/2521808913/in/photostream/

The annual Ottawa Race Weekend is a pretty big deal, whether or not you’re a runner. According to Run Ottawa, it’s Canada’s largest running weekend event, with almost 50,000 participants and six races ranging from 2K to Marathon. The outdoor event brings out lots of volunteers and spectators, too.

What’s more, Ottawa Race Weekend supports dozens of good causes. You can sign up to run or walk for a charity, or make a donation even if you’re not participating in the race.

Here are just a few of the worthwhile causes:

  • USC Canada’s Seed Saver Run supports USC Canada’s work with farmers around the world and in Canada to grow sustainable, healthy local food.
  • Team MitoCanada is raising funds and awareness about mitochondrial disease, a life-threatening type of illness which affects mainly children. This year, the team is supporting CHEO’s Research Institute in honour of Kate Drury.
  • Funds directed toward The Boys and Girls Club of Ottawa will support physical activity programs for children and youth.
  • Donations can also be directed to CHEO, Ottawa Hospital Foundation, Royal Ottawa Foundation for Mental Health, Canadian Cancer Society, Ottawa Network for Education, Ottawa Community Immigrant Services Organization, Christie Lake Kids and many others (see the website for a full list).

Ottawa Race Weekend is May 28-29, 2016—but register early if you’re running or walking, as spots will fill up soon. There’s lots more information on the race weekend website.

Update: I’m participating this year–in support of MitoCanada and in honour of Kate Drury, raising funds for the CHEO Research Institute to continue their groundbreaking work on mitochondrial diseases–once considered rare, but affecting at least 1 in 5000 people, mainly children. My page is here if you’re interested.

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