100in1Day 2018 in Ottawa

Guest post by Christine Earnshaw, Project Lead, 100in1Day, Synapcity. (Images courtesy of 100in1Day Ottawa.)

Saturday, June 2nd is 100in1Day.

100in1day is a global festival that activates citizen-led initiatives in public spaces across a city. Originating in Bogota, Colombia, and spreading to cities across the globe, the citizen-led festival is a platform for residents to host one hundred or more thoughtful and playful “interventions” across the city to transform outdoor public space and spark positive change.

Powered by Synapcity, 100in1Day is coming to Ottawa for the second time this year on June 2nd!

Interventions are activities that take place in parks, on the streets, in schoolyards and other public spaces. They are activities such as street art projects, free outdoor music performances, flash mob events, community bike rides, temporary art installations, pop-up parks, guerilla gardening projects, neighbourhood walking tours, and so much more. 100in1Day is a festival of possibility.

By registering an intervention, you can share your passion for the city and contribute to Ottawa’s community-building initiatives.

If you have an idea, would like more information or are ready to register your 100in1Day intervention, visit www.100in1day.ca or get in touch with the Project Lead at christine@synapcity.ca.

Let’s make this year bigger, more diverse and more inspiring than ever.

10 Reasons to Participate in 100in1Day

  1. Add beauty to a neglected or unexpected public space
  2. Bring people together through play
  3. Invite social interaction
  4. Liven up a public space
  5. Take it outside
  6. Support the environment
  7. Improve city infrastructure
  8. Act on an idea to improve the neighbourhood or the city
  9. Share knowledge and expertise
  10. Be creative!

 

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Green Screen Ottawa: Climate Change Film

I once turned down a UN job in the Maldive Islands. I thought I’d have the chance to get there someday anyhow–but that was before much was known about the risks that climate change poses to the existence of small island states like the Maldives.

Kiribati is another island nation on the front lines of rising sea levels due to climate change. Green Screen, along with Ecology Ottawa, the Sandy Hill Community Health Centre and other partners, are bringing an important film and discussion to Ottawa about climate change and its effects, including on Kiribati.

ANOTE’S ARK is a documentary about Kiribati’s efforts to save its nation, people and culture. It follows the story of both Kiribati’s president Anote Tong, and Tiemeri, a young mother of six attempting to migrate with her family to New Zealand.

ANOTE’S ARK will be shown on Wednesday, May 9, 2018 from 7-9:30 p.m. at the ByTowne Cinema. After the film, there’ll be a panel discussion on environmental organizing and connecting the struggles of Indigenous people in the film with local action.

The event is free but organizers are asking people to register in advance. Donations are welcome. The Facebook event page has further details.

Green Screen is a city-wide grassroots initiative organized by local Ottawa residents, with support from Ecology Ottawa, to engage our communities on climate change action. Through a series of film screenings in wards throughout the city, Green Screen strives to inspire local action on global issues, and show that by working on climate change in our own backyard we can have an impact on one of the world’s most pressing issues.

Jane’s Walk Ottawa 2018

Get to know your city and your neighbours; explore a new corner of Ottawa, or see a familiar, well-trodden area in a new light. You can do all of that and more at Jane’s Walk Ottawa, taking place on Saturday, May 5 and Sunday, May 6, 2018.

Jane’s Walk is one of my favourite events every year. It offers free walking tours, led by knowledgeable and engaging residents, to explore different areas of the city.

For more on Jane’s Walk Ottawa, what it’s all about and what’s on offer this year, check out this guest post.

Jane’s Walk Ottawa always includes numerous walks that explore Ottawa’s green spaces; consider how we as residents live in nature; cast a sharp eye on our land use and built environment choices; and look at what could be, as well as what has been. Here are some examples from this year’s schedule:

These are just a sample of the many historic, scenic and intriguing walks taking place during Jane’s Walk Ottawa weekend. Check out the full schedule and interactive map. Don’t forget the after-parties!

Jane’s Walk 2018 Celebrating Ottawa

Guest post contributed by Angela Plant, Jane’s Walk Ottawa Organizing Committee.

Every year Jane’s Walk convenes close to 2,000 Ottawa residents (May 5-6, 2018) to walk their city in a festival of over 60 community-led, free walking tours that put people in touch with their city.

Jane’s Walk began in May, 2007 in Toronto, and spread quickly. it was founded in honour of the ideas of Jane Jacobs.  Jane Jacobs (1916-2006) was an urbanist and activist whose writings championed a fresh, community-based approach to understanding, organizing, designing, and building cities. She had no formal training as a planner, and yet her 1961 best-seller, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, and her later books introduced ground-breaking ideas about how cities function, evolve, and succeed or fail.

In 2008, the festival was held in ten Canadian cities: here in Ottawa, as well as in Charlottetown, Halifax, Toronto, Guelph, London (ON), Thornbury-Clarksburg (ON), Winnipeg, Calgary, and Vancouver. Over 6000 people across Canada took part. It is now international.

We welcome you to attend one or more of our walks on the weekend of May 5-6! We promise that you will learn something, meet new people and come away feeling energized with ideas. Visit our website to view an interactive map of the walks!

We especially invite you to our Launch Event, a Jane’s Mob, May 3rd, Parkdale Park!

Check out the full schedule of walks on the Jane’s Walk Ottawa website!

Earth Day 2018 Climate Change Films

To mark Earth Day, Green Screen Ottawa is presenting a series of films on the theme of climate change. The event includes 3 showings of Bill Nye’s Global Meltdown (45 min.) as well as screenings of other short films (The Story of Stuff, tvebiomovies Global Youth Video Competition on Climate Change winners, A Sea Turtle Story).

The screening takes place at Carlingwood Shopping Centre (2121 Carling Ave.) on Sunday, Apr. 22, 2018 from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. It’s a free event (donations for Green Screen welcome). See the Facebook page for the schedule and further information.

Green Screen is a city-wide grassroots initiative organized by local Ottawa residents, with support from Ecology Ottawa, to engage our communities on climate change action. Through a series of film screenings in wards throughout the city, Green Screen strives to inspire local action on global issues, and show that by working on climate change in our own backyard we can have an impact on one of the world’s most pressing issues.”

Thanks to Green Screen Ottawa for the information.

Update: Also in Ottawa on Earth Day, Sunday Apr. 22, 2018:

And on Monday, Apr. 23, there’s a Ceremony for the Ottawa River at 1 p.m. by the Ottawa River below Parliament Hill.

The Basics: Water

A Tale of Two Cities film – via The Story of Stuff CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 on Twitter

Essential for our survival: water. Learn more this week about the threats to water globally and locally, and what we can do to address them.

A Tale of Two Cities and Water Warriors

This film screening and talk presents A Tale of Two Cities and Water Warriors, which look at community action to protect water from industrial development and privatization. Speakers are Algonquin Elder Verna McGregor from Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, Council of Canadians water campaigner Emma Lui, and video appearance by one of the Story of Stuff filmmakers. Free event (donations welcome) to mark World Water Day, organized by Council of Canadians’ Ottawa Chapter, on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, 7-8:30 p.m. at 251 Bank St. (2nd floor).

World Water Day Fast and Celebration

The Mamidosewin Centre hosts this gathering to honour the water we rely on. The fast, which takes place on Thursday, March 22, 2018 from 12:01 a.m.-11:01 a.m., will be followed by sharing of soup.

Protecting your Rights to Swim, Drink and Fish the Ottawa River, a talk by Riverkeeper Meredith Brown

Hear from Ottawa Riverkeeper Meredith Brown about the work that the Ottawa Riverkeeper, along with an array of other organizations and community members, are doing to protect rights to a clean and safe Ottawa River. This World Water Day talk will be held on Thursday, March 22, 2018, 2:45-3:45 p.m. at 182 University Centre, Carleton University. Organized by the Global Water Institute and Carleton University’s IWA/WEAO/OWWA Student Chapter. (Check out this and other upcoming GWI “Water Conversation” Series events on their website.)

World Water Day 2018 / Journée Mondiale de l’eau 2018 Event – Blue Drinks Ottawa

Blue Drinks Ottawa hosts this evening of refreshments and discussion on nature-based solutions to water challenges. Pizza and networking start at 5 p.m., followed by a panel discussion with James Brennan (Ducks Unlimited), Sara O’Neill (Smart Prosperity) and Eva Katic (National Capital Commission) at 6 p.m. The event takes place on Thursday, March 22, 2018 from 5-8 p.m. at the Ottawa Public Library Main Branch Auditorium, 120 Metcalfe St.

Also check out Council of Canadians’ suggestions for action on World Water Day here, and The Story of Stuff campaigns here.

Gifts that Won’t Cost the Earth

Image via Pexels Creative Commons Zero (CC0) https://www.pexels.com/

If, like me, you’ve been too busy with life to focus on seasonal pursuits (or blog posts–sorry about that), here are some earth-friendly (and local!) gift ideas that you can still find before the holidays.

The Maple Leaves of Kichi Makwa, a children’s book by local Algonquin elder, poet and storyteller Albert Dumont, addresses themes of nature, respect and support, and is written in Algonquin, English and French. Find it at Singing Pebble Booksonline, or from the author.

Escape from the Museum! is a mystery-adventure set in the impressive Canadian Museum of Nature, offered in collaboration with Escape Manor, that would make a fun gift for kids or adults alike. Groups can choose from two themes: “Back to the Fossils,” involving time travel to help some lost dinosaurs, and “Framed,” investigating a heist of specimens from the Mammals Gallery.  It’s an opportunity to explore the museum’s collections and spaces while solving challenges before the time runs out. (Escape Manor offers escape adventures at several other locations including Diefenbunker, downtown and at their Hintonburg location.)

These days it’s possible to find plenty of eco-friendly, locally crafted items around town that would make thoughtful gifts. One place to check out is Maker House. They have wall hooks made from fallen branches by Not Mother, a window planter made from reclaimed wood marked “less stuff more life” by Grains of Truth, and a framed vintage Ottawa map print, hand embroidered with a red heart, by Sadie & June, as well as much more. Plus, if you buy from Maker House during December, they’ll donate 2% of the sales to Parkdale Food Centre through the #craftchange program.

For more green gift ideas, see our past posts on Thingless GivingA Gift of ReadingGifts that Give Twice and Greening the Season.

Seasons greetings!

Written by Denise Deby.