Doors Open Ottawa 2018

Ottawa Valley Wild Bird Care Centre – Doors Open Ottawa 2018 image

Doors Open Ottawa invites you to visit places of interest in Ottawa, many of which are not normally open to the public. See architecturally significant, historic buildings, interesting community spaces, sites of scientific and technological interest, embassies, gardens, centres of religion, and more. The annual, free event happens Saturday, Jun. 2 and Sunday, Jun. 3, with more than 140 sites taking part this year.

A few examples:

There’s a free shuttle bus between 50 of the buildings; some (downtown) are walking distance apart.

See the full list of participating sites, an interactive map, and a downloadable mobile app on the City of Ottawa’s Doors Open Ottawa website.

 

Advertisements

#100in1Day Ottawa 2018

Image courtesy 100in1Day Ottawa/Synapcity

This weekend is packed with amazing things to do in Ottawa. For starters, there’s #100in1Day.

#100in1DayOTT consists of more than 100 creative and fun activities, all citizen-led, happening around the city on Saturday, Jun. 2, 2018.

The 100+ “interventions” are designed to illustrate the kind of sustainable, inclusive and accessible city we could have. Read more in Synapcity’s guest post and on the #100in1DayOTT website.

Here are just a few examples:

There’s so much more—check out the #100in1DayOTT website and interactive map.

Eel Walk for Biodiversity in Ottawa

Eel Walk image via Free the Falls (Facebook)

An upcoming Eel Walk is intended to raise awareness about the importance of a key and remarkable species in the Ottawa River—the American Eel—and to promote biodiversity and respect for Indigenous environmental knowledge.

Coinciding with the International Day for Biological Diversity, the family-friendly event includes art—participants can decorate windsock eels and meet a 27-foot long puppet eel—as well as walks between Victoria Island and Parliament Hill, ceremony and a feast.

Leading the walk is Algonquin knowledge keeper Larry McDermott, founder of Plenty Canada and co-author of The Recovery Strategy of the American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) in Ontario (2013) produced for the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, a report still awaiting official action.

The American Eel, which at one time comprised half of the fish biomass within the Ottawa River and provided 70% of the nutrition for Indigenous people living along the river, is endangered. The American Eel population has declined since the 1980s to less than 1% of its former abundance, due to human activity and habitat destruction.

Find out more about the problem and what needs to be done from the 2013 study and the Ottawa Riverkeeper’s campaign.

The Eel Walk, organized by Plenty Canada and Free the Falls, takes place from 8:30-1 p.m. on Monday, May 21, 2018; see the Facebook event page for the schedule and location details.

 

100in1Day 2018 in Ottawa

Guest post by Christine Earnshaw, Project Lead, 100in1Day, Synapcity. (Images courtesy of 100in1Day Ottawa.)

Saturday, June 2nd is 100in1Day.

100in1day is a global festival that activates citizen-led initiatives in public spaces across a city. Originating in Bogota, Colombia, and spreading to cities across the globe, the citizen-led festival is a platform for residents to host one hundred or more thoughtful and playful “interventions” across the city to transform outdoor public space and spark positive change.

Powered by Synapcity, 100in1Day is coming to Ottawa for the second time this year on June 2nd!

Interventions are activities that take place in parks, on the streets, in schoolyards and other public spaces. They are activities such as street art projects, free outdoor music performances, flash mob events, community bike rides, temporary art installations, pop-up parks, guerilla gardening projects, neighbourhood walking tours, and so much more. 100in1Day is a festival of possibility.

By registering an intervention, you can share your passion for the city and contribute to Ottawa’s community-building initiatives.

If you have an idea, would like more information or are ready to register your 100in1Day intervention, visit www.100in1day.ca or get in touch with the Project Lead at christine@synapcity.ca.

Let’s make this year bigger, more diverse and more inspiring than ever.

10 Reasons to Participate in 100in1Day

  1. Add beauty to a neglected or unexpected public space
  2. Bring people together through play
  3. Invite social interaction
  4. Liven up a public space
  5. Take it outside
  6. Support the environment
  7. Improve city infrastructure
  8. Act on an idea to improve the neighbourhood or the city
  9. Share knowledge and expertise
  10. Be creative!

 

Green Screen Ottawa: Climate Change Film

I once turned down a UN job in the Maldive Islands. I thought I’d have the chance to get there someday anyhow–but that was before much was known about the risks that climate change poses to the existence of small island states like the Maldives.

Kiribati is another island nation on the front lines of rising sea levels due to climate change. Green Screen, along with Ecology Ottawa, the Sandy Hill Community Health Centre and other partners, are bringing an important film and discussion to Ottawa about climate change and its effects, including on Kiribati.

ANOTE’S ARK is a documentary about Kiribati’s efforts to save its nation, people and culture. It follows the story of both Kiribati’s president Anote Tong, and Tiemeri, a young mother of six attempting to migrate with her family to New Zealand.

ANOTE’S ARK will be shown on Wednesday, May 9, 2018 from 7-9:30 p.m. at the ByTowne Cinema. After the film, there’ll be a panel discussion on environmental organizing and connecting the struggles of Indigenous people in the film with local action.

The event is free but organizers are asking people to register in advance. Donations are welcome. The Facebook event page has further details.

Green Screen is a city-wide grassroots initiative organized by local Ottawa residents, with support from Ecology Ottawa, to engage our communities on climate change action. Through a series of film screenings in wards throughout the city, Green Screen strives to inspire local action on global issues, and show that by working on climate change in our own backyard we can have an impact on one of the world’s most pressing issues.

Jane’s Walk Ottawa 2018

Get to know your city and your neighbours; explore a new corner of Ottawa, or see a familiar, well-trodden area in a new light. You can do all of that and more at Jane’s Walk Ottawa, taking place on Saturday, May 5 and Sunday, May 6, 2018.

Jane’s Walk is one of my favourite events every year. It offers free walking tours, led by knowledgeable and engaging residents, to explore different areas of the city.

For more on Jane’s Walk Ottawa, what it’s all about and what’s on offer this year, check out this guest post.

Jane’s Walk Ottawa always includes numerous walks that explore Ottawa’s green spaces; consider how we as residents live in nature; cast a sharp eye on our land use and built environment choices; and look at what could be, as well as what has been. Here are some examples from this year’s schedule:

These are just a sample of the many historic, scenic and intriguing walks taking place during Jane’s Walk Ottawa weekend. Check out the full schedule and interactive map. Don’t forget the after-parties!

Jane’s Walk 2018 Celebrating Ottawa

Guest post contributed by Angela Plant, Jane’s Walk Ottawa Organizing Committee.

Every year Jane’s Walk convenes close to 2,000 Ottawa residents (May 5-6, 2018) to walk their city in a festival of over 60 community-led, free walking tours that put people in touch with their city.

Jane’s Walk began in May, 2007 in Toronto, and spread quickly. it was founded in honour of the ideas of Jane Jacobs.  Jane Jacobs (1916-2006) was an urbanist and activist whose writings championed a fresh, community-based approach to understanding, organizing, designing, and building cities. She had no formal training as a planner, and yet her 1961 best-seller, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, and her later books introduced ground-breaking ideas about how cities function, evolve, and succeed or fail.

In 2008, the festival was held in ten Canadian cities: here in Ottawa, as well as in Charlottetown, Halifax, Toronto, Guelph, London (ON), Thornbury-Clarksburg (ON), Winnipeg, Calgary, and Vancouver. Over 6000 people across Canada took part. It is now international.

We welcome you to attend one or more of our walks on the weekend of May 5-6! We promise that you will learn something, meet new people and come away feeling energized with ideas. Visit our website to view an interactive map of the walks!

We especially invite you to our Launch Event, a Jane’s Mob, May 3rd, Parkdale Park!

Check out the full schedule of walks on the Jane’s Walk Ottawa website!