Support for the Environment and Sustainable Energy

Some upcoming events to check out:

Parliament Hill Rally for Nuclear Safety, Monday, Apr. 23, 2018 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. (meet at the flame). Hosted by Concerned Citizens, this event to protect the Ottawa River against a planned nuclear waste dump at Chalk River includes statements by First Nations and citizens groups, songs and drumming, and a walk to the Ottawa River. A Ceremony for the Ottawa River, led by Algonquin Elder Albert Dumont South Wind, will follow.

Minister Carr: climate + Indigenous rights > Kinder Morgan takes place on Monday, Apr. 23, 2018 from 4:30-6 p.m. at Tabaret Hall, University of Ottawa. It’s a response to an address by Jim Carr, federal Minister of Natural Resources on energy.

Emergency Rally: Separate Oil and State #StopKM will take place on a day to be confirmed after April 24, after the federal government announces legislation to be tabled on the Kinder Morgan pipeline. Organized by the Council of Canadians, in solidarity with Indigenous-led opposition to the pipeline.

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Earth Day 2018 Climate Change Films

To mark Earth Day, Green Screen Ottawa is presenting a series of films on the theme of climate change. The event includes 3 showings of Bill Nye’s Global Meltdown (45 min.) as well as screenings of other short films (The Story of Stuff, tvebiomovies Global Youth Video Competition on Climate Change winners, A Sea Turtle Story).

The screening takes place at Carlingwood Shopping Centre (2121 Carling Ave.) on Sunday, Apr. 22, 2018 from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. It’s a free event (donations for Green Screen welcome). See the Facebook page for the schedule and further information.

Green Screen is a city-wide grassroots initiative organized by local Ottawa residents, with support from Ecology Ottawa, to engage our communities on climate change action. Through a series of film screenings in wards throughout the city, Green Screen strives to inspire local action on global issues, and show that by working on climate change in our own backyard we can have an impact on one of the world’s most pressing issues.”

Thanks to Green Screen Ottawa for the information.

Update: Also in Ottawa on Earth Day, Sunday Apr. 22, 2018:

And on Monday, Apr. 23, there’s a Ceremony for the Ottawa River at 1 p.m. by the Ottawa River below Parliament Hill.

Ottawa Park Summit and Earth Day Party 2018

Ecology Ottawa, in collaboration with Park People, is holding the annual Ottawa Park Summit on Saturday, Apr. 21, 2018. The aim is to bring residents together to plan for and engage in making our parks green and effective spaces.

After the Summit, Ecology Ottawa hosts an Earth Day Party to celebrate Earth Day and the efforts of all in Ottawa who are working to create a sustainable city.

The Ottawa Park Summit takes place from 2-6 p.m. at allsaints Event Space (10 Blackburn Ave.). The Earth Day Party runs 8-11 p.m. at 25One Community (251 Bank St.).

 

Old Home Earth Day Event 2018

Here’s an opportunity to celebrate Earth Day while discovering more ways to green your home and energy use: the Old Home Earth Day Event on Saturday, Apr. 21, 2018 brings organizations, businesses and the public together for a free fair on reducing your carbon footprint and living more sustainably.

Ottawa Renewable Energy Co-op, the Ottawa Tool Library, Nugrocery and EnviroCentre are among the groups on hand. The day includes free workshops, exhibits and a DIY space. Topics include improving home energy efficiency, renovations, sustainability through transportation and food choices, and more.

This second annual Old Home Earth Day Event is organized by the Glebe Community Association’s Environment Committee along with SMARTNet Alliance, the Peace and Environment Resource Centre, Ottawa Renewable Energy Co-op and Bullfrog Power. OHEDE takes place at the Glebe Community Centre (175 Third Ave.) on Saturday, Apr. 21 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Thanks to the Glebe Environment Committee for the information and images.

Green Spaces/Espaces Verts

If you’re an organization, business, government, post-secondary, or Indigenous organization employer looking to hire someone to work on environment-related initiatives, or a student (aged 15-30) looking for an environment-related summer job, you’ll want to check out the United Nations Association in Canada (UNA-Canada)’s Green Spaces/Espaces Verts initiative.

Green Spaces/Espaces Verts connects youth with employers for summer work placements that take place mainly in parks and natural settings. The focus is on reducing carbon emissions and community engagement around carbon reduction. UNA-Canada subsidizes about 50 per cent of the wages, and employers can become part of a national Green Spaces/Espaces Verts network to showcase and support their green efforts.

You’ll need to act quickly: the application deadline is April 19, 2018 for jobs taking place between May 1 and August 31, 2018. See further details and links for students and employers to apply on the Green Spaces/Espaces Verts website.

Thanks to UNA-Canada for the information.

The Basics: Water

A Tale of Two Cities film – via The Story of Stuff CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 on Twitter

Essential for our survival: water. Learn more this week about the threats to water globally and locally, and what we can do to address them.

A Tale of Two Cities and Water Warriors

This film screening and talk presents A Tale of Two Cities and Water Warriors, which look at community action to protect water from industrial development and privatization. Speakers are Algonquin Elder Verna McGregor from Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, Council of Canadians water campaigner Emma Lui, and video appearance by one of the Story of Stuff filmmakers. Free event (donations welcome) to mark World Water Day, organized by Council of Canadians’ Ottawa Chapter, on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, 7-8:30 p.m. at 251 Bank St. (2nd floor).

World Water Day Fast and Celebration

The Mamidosewin Centre hosts this gathering to honour the water we rely on. The fast, which takes place on Thursday, March 22, 2018 from 12:01 a.m.-11:01 a.m., will be followed by sharing of soup.

Protecting your Rights to Swim, Drink and Fish the Ottawa River, a talk by Riverkeeper Meredith Brown

Hear from Ottawa Riverkeeper Meredith Brown about the work that the Ottawa Riverkeeper, along with an array of other organizations and community members, are doing to protect rights to a clean and safe Ottawa River. This World Water Day talk will be held on Thursday, March 22, 2018, 2:45-3:45 p.m. at 182 University Centre, Carleton University. Organized by the Global Water Institute and Carleton University’s IWA/WEAO/OWWA Student Chapter. (Check out this and other upcoming GWI “Water Conversation” Series events on their website.)

World Water Day 2018 / Journée Mondiale de l’eau 2018 Event – Blue Drinks Ottawa

Blue Drinks Ottawa hosts this evening of refreshments and discussion on nature-based solutions to water challenges. Pizza and networking start at 5 p.m., followed by a panel discussion with James Brennan (Ducks Unlimited), Sara O’Neill (Smart Prosperity) and Eva Katic (National Capital Commission) at 6 p.m. The event takes place on Thursday, March 22, 2018 from 5-8 p.m. at the Ottawa Public Library Main Branch Auditorium, 120 Metcalfe St.

Also check out Council of Canadians’ suggestions for action on World Water Day here, and The Story of Stuff campaigns here.

The Basics: Land (and Everything)

Chaudiere Falls, Ottawa, from the Bytown Banks
Chaudiere Falls, Ottawa, from the Bytown Banks, July 1838, image by Philip John Bainbridge (collectionscanada.gc.ca) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
What does it mean to protect “the commons” when “the commons” is stolen land? This will be the focus of a conversation between author Craig Fortier (Unsettling the Commons: Social Movements Within, Against, and Beyond Settler Colonialism) and writer and activist Fiona Jeffries (author of Nothing to Lose But Our Fear: Resistance in Dangerous Times). The launch of Unsettling the Commons takes place on Wednesday, March 21, 2018 at 7 p.m. at Octopus Books, 116 Third Ave.

An important read about land and water in Ottawa: Lynn Gehl’s article Akikodjiwan: The Destruction of Canada’s Heart of Reconciliation, published in the Watershed Sentinel (March 8, 2018). Lynn Gehl explains how reconciliation and environmental progress are impossible as long as local and federal governments do not recognize and respect Algonquin jurisdiction and rights.