Support for the Environment and Sustainable Energy

Some upcoming events to check out:

Parliament Hill Rally for Nuclear Safety, Monday, Apr. 23, 2018 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. (meet at the flame). Hosted by Concerned Citizens, this event to protect the Ottawa River against a planned nuclear waste dump at Chalk River includes statements by First Nations and citizens groups, songs and drumming, and a walk to the Ottawa River. A Ceremony for the Ottawa River, led by Algonquin Elder Albert Dumont South Wind, will follow.

Minister Carr: climate + Indigenous rights > Kinder Morgan takes place on Monday, Apr. 23, 2018 from 4:30-6 p.m. at Tabaret Hall, University of Ottawa. It’s a response to an address by Jim Carr, federal Minister of Natural Resources on energy.

Emergency Rally: Separate Oil and State #StopKM will take place on a day to be confirmed after April 24, after the federal government announces legislation to be tabled on the Kinder Morgan pipeline. Organized by the Council of Canadians, in solidarity with Indigenous-led opposition to the pipeline.

Advertisements

The Basics: Water

A Tale of Two Cities film – via The Story of Stuff CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 on Twitter

Essential for our survival: water. Learn more this week about the threats to water globally and locally, and what we can do to address them.

A Tale of Two Cities and Water Warriors

This film screening and talk presents A Tale of Two Cities and Water Warriors, which look at community action to protect water from industrial development and privatization. Speakers are Algonquin Elder Verna McGregor from Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg, Council of Canadians water campaigner Emma Lui, and video appearance by one of the Story of Stuff filmmakers. Free event (donations welcome) to mark World Water Day, organized by Council of Canadians’ Ottawa Chapter, on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, 7-8:30 p.m. at 251 Bank St. (2nd floor).

World Water Day Fast and Celebration

The Mamidosewin Centre hosts this gathering to honour the water we rely on. The fast, which takes place on Thursday, March 22, 2018 from 12:01 a.m.-11:01 a.m., will be followed by sharing of soup.

Protecting your Rights to Swim, Drink and Fish the Ottawa River, a talk by Riverkeeper Meredith Brown

Hear from Ottawa Riverkeeper Meredith Brown about the work that the Ottawa Riverkeeper, along with an array of other organizations and community members, are doing to protect rights to a clean and safe Ottawa River. This World Water Day talk will be held on Thursday, March 22, 2018, 2:45-3:45 p.m. at 182 University Centre, Carleton University. Organized by the Global Water Institute and Carleton University’s IWA/WEAO/OWWA Student Chapter. (Check out this and other upcoming GWI “Water Conversation” Series events on their website.)

World Water Day 2018 / Journée Mondiale de l’eau 2018 Event – Blue Drinks Ottawa

Blue Drinks Ottawa hosts this evening of refreshments and discussion on nature-based solutions to water challenges. Pizza and networking start at 5 p.m., followed by a panel discussion with James Brennan (Ducks Unlimited), Sara O’Neill (Smart Prosperity) and Eva Katic (National Capital Commission) at 6 p.m. The event takes place on Thursday, March 22, 2018 from 5-8 p.m. at the Ottawa Public Library Main Branch Auditorium, 120 Metcalfe St.

Also check out Council of Canadians’ suggestions for action on World Water Day here, and The Story of Stuff campaigns here.

The Basics: Land (and Everything)

Chaudiere Falls, Ottawa, from the Bytown Banks
Chaudiere Falls, Ottawa, from the Bytown Banks, July 1838, image by Philip John Bainbridge (collectionscanada.gc.ca) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
What does it mean to protect “the commons” when “the commons” is stolen land? This will be the focus of a conversation between author Craig Fortier (Unsettling the Commons: Social Movements Within, Against, and Beyond Settler Colonialism) and writer and activist Fiona Jeffries (author of Nothing to Lose But Our Fear: Resistance in Dangerous Times). The launch of Unsettling the Commons takes place on Wednesday, March 21, 2018 at 7 p.m. at Octopus Books, 116 Third Ave.

An important read about land and water in Ottawa: Lynn Gehl’s article Akikodjiwan: The Destruction of Canada’s Heart of Reconciliation, published in the Watershed Sentinel (March 8, 2018). Lynn Gehl explains how reconciliation and environmental progress are impossible as long as local and federal governments do not recognize and respect Algonquin jurisdiction and rights.

Festivals in Ottawa

Grass Dancer via Summer Solstice Indigenous Festival https://www.ottawasummersolstice.ca/media/

It’s definitely festival season in Ottawa.

Festivals can be great ways to get outside, celebrate the diversity that is Ottawa, and connect with community. Starting this week:

Welcoming Ottawa WeekJune 20-30, 2017

Welcoming Ottawa Week is an annual festival celebrating Ottawa as a city that welcomes newcomers, and hosting events where residents can get to know more about each other. Activities include a series of heritage walks in Chinatown, Little Italy and Lowertown with local residents sharing the stories of how immigrants have shaped those neighbourhoods, and Indigenous Walks, to understand Ottawa’s public spaces from an Indigenous perspective. There’s also a recreational soccer tournament, photo and art exhibits, film screenings, community picnics and much more.

Summer Solstice Indigenous Festival, June 20-25, 2017

This colourful and fascinating annual festival at Vincent Massey Park (and a few other places) celebrates the artistic and culture diversity of First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples. It includes live musical performances, theatre, art and food vendors, Aboriginal Day Live! and a three-day Pow Wow. Not to miss.

Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival, June 22-25, 2017

With origins connected to nature and the bounty of the land and water, the annual Ottawa Dragon Boat Festival brings more than 150 teams to compete in dragon boat races at Mooney’s Bay Park. There’s also live music, a family zone, food vendors and more.

Also on: Canada Scene, the Ottawa Jazz Festival and Festival de la St-Jean à Ottawa.

Flooding in Ottawa-Gatineau

Thoughts go out to everyone affected by the flooding.

The City of Ottawa and the City of Gatineau have posted information about the flooding, how to stay safe in flood conditions (around the water, near electricity and with drinking water), and where to obtain assistance.

Other information available:

How to volunteer to help with flooding recovery over the next few weeks: https://ottawa.ca/en/register-volunteer-flooding-efforts

Where to donate to support recovery efforts through the Salvation Army or Canadian Red Cross: http://ottawa.ca/en/residents/older-adults/safety/emergency-preparedness/emergency-notifications-flooding-information#-donations

Where to get help for coping with stress, worry and other mental health needs (links for the Distress Centre, Tel-Aide Outaouais, Walk-In Counselling Clinics and other supports): http://ottawa.ca/en/residents/older-adults/safety/emergency-preparedness/emergency-notifications-flooding-information#responding-stressful-events

The Ottawa Riverkeeper also has information and links on what to do and where to get help.

Stay safe, everyone.

Posted by Denise Deby.

 

 

Local Writers/Activists Talk Indigenous Land Defence

jan7-singingpebble-dominion-facebook-image

Posted by Denise Deby.

In a November post, I referred to Indigenous and other groups taking action to protect land and water against inappropriate, ecologically harmful development.

The Dominion’s most recent issue, “Warrior Up,” is all about Indigenous land defenders across Canada, featuring 24 articles by Indigenous writers and activists.

Three of those writers/activists will be at Singing Pebble Books (206 Main St.) on Saturday, Jan. 7, 2017, from 2-5 p.m. to talk about the issues and sign copies of the magazine:

Find out more about the three speakers and event details on the event page.

Thanks to The Dominion, you can read the full issue via their website.

More Actions for the Environment

dec-7-event

Update: An Indigenous Land Defence event will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. It’s in support of Standing Rock/#NoDAPL, the Chaudière Falls sacred site (in Ottawa), the Treaty Alliance against tar sands expansion and the Algonquins of Barriere Lake No Mining! Land Defenders Camp.

Featuring speakers and multimedia, the event takes place at the Bronson Centre (211 Bronson Ave.), but will also be livestreamed. See IPSMO’s website or Facebook event page for details. Funds are being collected for the Algonquins of Barriere Lake land defence efforts.

* * *

Via https://www.facebook.com/events/276625229401814/
Via https://www.facebook.com/events/276625229401814/

Written by Denise Deby.

Last week I posted about some of the actions happening in Ottawa in support of people and groups in Canada, the U.S. and Indigenous territories defending land and water against destructive development.

Here are two more events, taking place Monday, Dec. 5, 2016:

Prime Minister Trudeau approved the Kinder Morgan and Line 3 tar sands pipelines. If just one of these pipelines is built, it will unleash enough climate pollution to undo the proposed phase out of coal, the carbon tax and the low carbon fuel standards combined, and then some. These pipelines are strongly opposed by Indigenous communities along the route. A spill threatens drinking water and coastal waters including critical Orca habitat.
For more information:
www.canadians.org/pipelines
https://350.org/category/location/canada/
http://twnsacredtrust.ca/

  • POSTPONED: Also, the Indigenous Peoples’ Solidarity Movement Ottawa is organizing a #NoDAPL Day of Action in Ottawa, from 1-3:30 p.m., starting at the fountain in Confederation Park. It’s a response to the Camp of the Sacred Stone‘s call for a month of global resistance against the Dakota Access Pipeline. From IPSMO’s event post: “Based on Global Calls for Action, we are organizing a Non-Violent Direct Action to publicly ask Banks to divest from the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).” See important details and updates on their post.

Other (online) actions to check out:

  • Environmental Defence has launched a campaign to raise funds and support for a legal challenge to the federal government’s pipeline decision;
  • The David Suzuki Foundation has posted a letter that people can sign asking the federal government to rethink its approval of the pipelines.

For an analysis of the flaws in the pipeline approval process, and the adverse affects that moving ahead with them will have, see this article in The Tyee.